Fast HTTP package for Go. Tuned for high performance. Zero memory allocations in hot paths. Up to 10x faster than net/http

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FastHTTP – Fastest and reliable HTTP implementation in Go

Fast HTTP implementation for Go.

Currently fasthttp is successfully used by VertaMedia in a production serving up to 200K rps from more than 1.5M concurrent keep-alive connections per physical server.

TechEmpower Benchmark round 19 results

Server Benchmarks

Client Benchmarks

Install

Documentation

Examples from docs

Code examples

Awesome fasthttp tools

Switching from net/http to fasthttp

Fasthttp best practices

Tricks with byte buffers

Related projects

FAQ

HTTP server performance comparison with net/http

In short, fasthttp server is up to 10 times faster than net/http. Below are benchmark results.

GOMAXPROCS=1

net/http server:

$ GOMAXPROCS=1 go test -bench=NetHTTPServerGet -benchmem -benchtime=10s
BenchmarkNetHTTPServerGet1ReqPerConn                	 1000000	     12052 ns/op	    2297 B/op	      29 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPServerGet2ReqPerConn                	 1000000	     12278 ns/op	    2327 B/op	      24 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPServerGet10ReqPerConn               	 2000000	      8903 ns/op	    2112 B/op	      19 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPServerGet10KReqPerConn              	 2000000	      8451 ns/op	    2058 B/op	      18 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPServerGet1ReqPerConn10KClients      	  500000	     26733 ns/op	    3229 B/op	      29 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPServerGet2ReqPerConn10KClients      	 1000000	     23351 ns/op	    3211 B/op	      24 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPServerGet10ReqPerConn10KClients     	 1000000	     13390 ns/op	    2483 B/op	      19 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPServerGet100ReqPerConn10KClients    	 1000000	     13484 ns/op	    2171 B/op	      18 allocs/op

fasthttp server:

$ GOMAXPROCS=1 go test -bench=kServerGet -benchmem -benchtime=10s
BenchmarkServerGet1ReqPerConn                       	10000000	      1559 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkServerGet2ReqPerConn                       	10000000	      1248 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkServerGet10ReqPerConn                      	20000000	       797 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkServerGet10KReqPerConn                     	20000000	       716 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkServerGet1ReqPerConn10KClients             	10000000	      1974 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkServerGet2ReqPerConn10KClients             	10000000	      1352 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkServerGet10ReqPerConn10KClients            	20000000	       789 ns/op	       2 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkServerGet100ReqPerConn10KClients           	20000000	       604 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op

GOMAXPROCS=4

net/http server:

$ GOMAXPROCS=4 go test -bench=NetHTTPServerGet -benchmem -benchtime=10s
BenchmarkNetHTTPServerGet1ReqPerConn-4                  	 3000000	      4529 ns/op	    2389 B/op	      29 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPServerGet2ReqPerConn-4                  	 5000000	      3896 ns/op	    2418 B/op	      24 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPServerGet10ReqPerConn-4                 	 5000000	      3145 ns/op	    2160 B/op	      19 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPServerGet10KReqPerConn-4                	 5000000	      3054 ns/op	    2065 B/op	      18 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPServerGet1ReqPerConn10KClients-4        	 1000000	     10321 ns/op	    3710 B/op	      30 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPServerGet2ReqPerConn10KClients-4        	 2000000	      7556 ns/op	    3296 B/op	      24 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPServerGet10ReqPerConn10KClients-4       	 5000000	      3905 ns/op	    2349 B/op	      19 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPServerGet100ReqPerConn10KClients-4      	 5000000	      3435 ns/op	    2130 B/op	      18 allocs/op

fasthttp server:

$ GOMAXPROCS=4 go test -bench=kServerGet -benchmem -benchtime=10s
BenchmarkServerGet1ReqPerConn-4                         	10000000	      1141 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkServerGet2ReqPerConn-4                         	20000000	       707 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkServerGet10ReqPerConn-4                        	30000000	       341 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkServerGet10KReqPerConn-4                       	50000000	       310 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkServerGet1ReqPerConn10KClients-4               	10000000	      1119 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkServerGet2ReqPerConn10KClients-4               	20000000	       644 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkServerGet10ReqPerConn10KClients-4              	30000000	       346 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkServerGet100ReqPerConn10KClients-4             	50000000	       282 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op

HTTP client comparison with net/http

In short, fasthttp client is up to 10 times faster than net/http. Below are benchmark results.

GOMAXPROCS=1

net/http client:

$ GOMAXPROCS=1 go test -bench='HTTPClient(Do|GetEndToEnd)' -benchmem -benchtime=10s
BenchmarkNetHTTPClientDoFastServer                  	 1000000	     12567 ns/op	    2616 B/op	      35 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPClientGetEndToEnd1TCP               	  200000	     67030 ns/op	    5028 B/op	      56 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPClientGetEndToEnd10TCP              	  300000	     51098 ns/op	    5031 B/op	      56 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPClientGetEndToEnd100TCP             	  300000	     45096 ns/op	    5026 B/op	      55 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPClientGetEndToEnd1Inmemory          	  500000	     24779 ns/op	    5035 B/op	      57 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPClientGetEndToEnd10Inmemory         	 1000000	     26425 ns/op	    5035 B/op	      57 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPClientGetEndToEnd100Inmemory        	  500000	     28515 ns/op	    5045 B/op	      57 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPClientGetEndToEnd1000Inmemory       	  500000	     39511 ns/op	    5096 B/op	      56 allocs/op

fasthttp client:

$ GOMAXPROCS=1 go test -bench='kClient(Do|GetEndToEnd)' -benchmem -benchtime=10s
BenchmarkClientDoFastServer                         	20000000	       865 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkClientGetEndToEnd1TCP                      	 1000000	     18711 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkClientGetEndToEnd10TCP                     	 1000000	     14664 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkClientGetEndToEnd100TCP                    	 1000000	     14043 ns/op	       1 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkClientGetEndToEnd1Inmemory                 	 5000000	      3965 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkClientGetEndToEnd10Inmemory                	 3000000	      4060 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkClientGetEndToEnd100Inmemory               	 5000000	      3396 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkClientGetEndToEnd1000Inmemory              	 5000000	      3306 ns/op	       2 B/op	       0 allocs/op

GOMAXPROCS=4

net/http client:

$ GOMAXPROCS=4 go test -bench='HTTPClient(Do|GetEndToEnd)' -benchmem -benchtime=10s
BenchmarkNetHTTPClientDoFastServer-4                    	 2000000	      8774 ns/op	    2619 B/op	      35 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPClientGetEndToEnd1TCP-4                 	  500000	     22951 ns/op	    5047 B/op	      56 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPClientGetEndToEnd10TCP-4                	 1000000	     19182 ns/op	    5037 B/op	      55 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPClientGetEndToEnd100TCP-4               	 1000000	     16535 ns/op	    5031 B/op	      55 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPClientGetEndToEnd1Inmemory-4            	 1000000	     14495 ns/op	    5038 B/op	      56 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPClientGetEndToEnd10Inmemory-4           	 1000000	     10237 ns/op	    5034 B/op	      56 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPClientGetEndToEnd100Inmemory-4          	 1000000	     10125 ns/op	    5045 B/op	      56 allocs/op
BenchmarkNetHTTPClientGetEndToEnd1000Inmemory-4         	 1000000	     11132 ns/op	    5136 B/op	      56 allocs/op

fasthttp client:

$ GOMAXPROCS=4 go test -bench='kClient(Do|GetEndToEnd)' -benchmem -benchtime=10s
BenchmarkClientDoFastServer-4                           	50000000	       397 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkClientGetEndToEnd1TCP-4                        	 2000000	      7388 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkClientGetEndToEnd10TCP-4                       	 2000000	      6689 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkClientGetEndToEnd100TCP-4                      	 3000000	      4927 ns/op	       1 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkClientGetEndToEnd1Inmemory-4                   	10000000	      1604 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkClientGetEndToEnd10Inmemory-4                  	10000000	      1458 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkClientGetEndToEnd100Inmemory-4                 	10000000	      1329 ns/op	       0 B/op	       0 allocs/op
BenchmarkClientGetEndToEnd1000Inmemory-4                	10000000	      1316 ns/op	       5 B/op	       0 allocs/op

Install

go get -u github.com/valyala/fasthttp

Switching from net/http to fasthttp

Unfortunately, fasthttp doesn't provide API identical to net/http. See the FAQ for details. There is net/http -> fasthttp handler converter, but it is better to write fasthttp request handlers by hand in order to use all of the fasthttp advantages (especially high performance :) ).

Important points:

  • Fasthttp works with RequestHandler functions instead of objects implementing Handler interface. Fortunately, it is easy to pass bound struct methods to fasthttp:

    type MyHandler struct {
    	foobar string
    }
    
    // request handler in net/http style, i.e. method bound to MyHandler struct.
    func (h *MyHandler) HandleFastHTTP(ctx *fasthttp.RequestCtx) {
    	// notice that we may access MyHandler properties here - see h.foobar.
    	fmt.Fprintf(ctx, "Hello, world! Requested path is %q. Foobar is %q",
    		ctx.Path(), h.foobar)
    }
    
    // request handler in fasthttp style, i.e. just plain function.
    func fastHTTPHandler(ctx *fasthttp.RequestCtx) {
    	fmt.Fprintf(ctx, "Hi there! RequestURI is %q", ctx.RequestURI())
    }
    
    // pass bound struct method to fasthttp
    myHandler := &MyHandler{
    	foobar: "foobar",
    }
    fasthttp.ListenAndServe(":8080", myHandler.HandleFastHTTP)
    
    // pass plain function to fasthttp
    fasthttp.ListenAndServe(":8081", fastHTTPHandler)
  • The RequestHandler accepts only one argument - RequestCtx. It contains all the functionality required for http request processing and response writing. Below is an example of a simple request handler conversion from net/http to fasthttp.

    // net/http request handler
    requestHandler := func(w http.ResponseWriter, r *http.Request) {
    	switch r.URL.Path {
    	case "/foo":
    		fooHandler(w, r)
    	case "/bar":
    		barHandler(w, r)
    	default:
    		http.Error(w, "Unsupported path", http.StatusNotFound)
    	}
    }
    // the corresponding fasthttp request handler
    requestHandler := func(ctx *fasthttp.RequestCtx) {
    	switch string(ctx.Path()) {
    	case "/foo":
    		fooHandler(ctx)
    	case "/bar":
    		barHandler(ctx)
    	default:
    		ctx.Error("Unsupported path", fasthttp.StatusNotFound)
    	}
    }
  • Fasthttp allows setting response headers and writing response body in an arbitrary order. There is no 'headers first, then body' restriction like in net/http. The following code is valid for fasthttp:

    requestHandler := func(ctx *fasthttp.RequestCtx) {
    	// set some headers and status code first
    	ctx.SetContentType("foo/bar")
    	ctx.SetStatusCode(fasthttp.StatusOK)
    
    	// then write the first part of body
    	fmt.Fprintf(ctx, "this is the first part of body\n")
    
    	// then set more headers
    	ctx.Response.Header.Set("Foo-Bar", "baz")
    
    	// then write more body
    	fmt.Fprintf(ctx, "this is the second part of body\n")
    
    	// then override already written body
    	ctx.SetBody([]byte("this is completely new body contents"))
    
    	// then update status code
    	ctx.SetStatusCode(fasthttp.StatusNotFound)
    
    	// basically, anything may be updated many times before
    	// returning from RequestHandler.
    	//
    	// Unlike net/http fasthttp doesn't put response to the wire until
    	// returning from RequestHandler.
    }
  • Fasthttp doesn't provide ServeMux, but there are more powerful third-party routers and web frameworks with fasthttp support:

    Net/http code with simple ServeMux is trivially converted to fasthttp code:

    // net/http code
    
    m := &http.ServeMux{}
    m.HandleFunc("/foo", fooHandlerFunc)
    m.HandleFunc("/bar", barHandlerFunc)
    m.Handle("/baz", bazHandler)
    
    http.ListenAndServe(":80", m)
    // the corresponding fasthttp code
    m := func(ctx *fasthttp.RequestCtx) {
    	switch string(ctx.Path()) {
    	case "/foo":
    		fooHandlerFunc(ctx)
    	case "/bar":
    		barHandlerFunc(ctx)
    	case "/baz":
    		bazHandler.HandlerFunc(ctx)
    	default:
    		ctx.Error("not found", fasthttp.StatusNotFound)
    	}
    }
    
    fasthttp.ListenAndServe(":80", m)
  • net/http -> fasthttp conversion table:

    • All the pseudocode below assumes w, r and ctx have these types:
      var (
      	w http.ResponseWriter
      	r *http.Request
      	ctx *fasthttp.RequestCtx
      )
  • VERY IMPORTANT! Fasthttp disallows holding references to RequestCtx or to its' members after returning from RequestHandler. Otherwise data races are inevitable. Carefully inspect all the net/http request handlers converted to fasthttp whether they retain references to RequestCtx or to its' members after returning. RequestCtx provides the following band aids for this case:

    • Wrap RequestHandler into TimeoutHandler.
    • Call TimeoutError before returning from RequestHandler if there are references to RequestCtx or to its' members. See the example for more details.

Use this brilliant tool - race detector - for detecting and eliminating data races in your program. If you detected data race related to fasthttp in your program, then there is high probability you forgot calling TimeoutError before returning from RequestHandler.

Performance optimization tips for multi-core systems

  • Use reuseport listener.
  • Run a separate server instance per CPU core with GOMAXPROCS=1.
  • Pin each server instance to a separate CPU core using taskset.
  • Ensure the interrupts of multiqueue network card are evenly distributed between CPU cores. See this article for details.
  • Use Go 1.13 as it provides some considerable performance improvements.

Fasthttp best practices

  • Do not allocate objects and []byte buffers - just reuse them as much as possible. Fasthttp API design encourages this.
  • sync.Pool is your best friend.
  • Profile your program in production. go tool pprof --alloc_objects your-program mem.pprof usually gives better insights for optimization opportunities than go tool pprof your-program cpu.pprof.
  • Write tests and benchmarks for hot paths.
  • Avoid conversion between []byte and string, since this may result in memory allocation+copy. Fasthttp API provides functions for both []byte and string - use these functions instead of converting manually between []byte and string. There are some exceptions - see this wiki page for more details.
  • Verify your tests and production code under race detector on a regular basis.
  • Prefer quicktemplate instead of html/template in your webserver.

Tricks with []byte buffers

The following tricks are used by fasthttp. Use them in your code too.

  • Standard Go functions accept nil buffers
var (
	// both buffers are uninitialized
	dst []byte
	src []byte
)
dst = append(dst, src...)  // is legal if dst is nil and/or src is nil
copy(dst, src)  // is legal if dst is nil and/or src is nil
(string(src) == "")  // is true if src is nil
(len(src) == 0)  // is true if src is nil
src = src[:0]  // works like a charm with nil src

// this for loop doesn't panic if src is nil
for i, ch := range src {
	doSomething(i, ch)
}

So throw away nil checks for []byte buffers from you code. For example,

srcLen := 0
if src != nil {
	srcLen = len(src)
}

becomes

srcLen := len(src)
  • String may be appended to []byte buffer with append
dst = append(dst, "foobar"...)
  • []byte buffer may be extended to its' capacity.
buf := make([]byte, 100)
a := buf[:10]  // len(a) == 10, cap(a) == 100.
b := a[:100]  // is valid, since cap(a) == 100.
  • All fasthttp functions accept nil []byte buffer
statusCode, body, err := fasthttp.Get(nil, "http://google.com/")
uintBuf := fasthttp.AppendUint(nil, 1234)

Related projects

  • fasthttp - various useful helpers for projects based on fasthttp.
  • fasthttp-routing - fast and powerful routing package for fasthttp servers.
  • router - a high performance fasthttp request router that scales well.
  • fastws - Bloatless WebSocket package made for fasthttp to handle Read/Write operations concurrently.
  • gramework - a web framework made by one of fasthttp maintainers
  • lu - a high performance go middleware web framework which is based on fasthttp.
  • websocket - Gorilla-based websocket implementation for fasthttp.
  • fasthttpsession - a fast and powerful session package for fasthttp servers.
  • atreugo - High performance and extensible micro web framework with zero memory allocations in hot paths.
  • kratgo - Simple, lightweight and ultra-fast HTTP Cache to speed up your websites.
  • kit-plugins - go-kit transport implementation for fasthttp.
  • Fiber - An Expressjs inspired web framework running on Fasthttp
  • Gearbox - ⚙️ gearbox is a web framework written in Go with a focus on high performance and memory optimization

FAQ

  • Why creating yet another http package instead of optimizing net/http?

    Because net/http API limits many optimization opportunities. For example:

    • net/http Request object lifetime isn't limited by request handler execution time. So the server must create a new request object per each request instead of reusing existing objects like fasthttp does.
    • net/http headers are stored in a map[string][]string. So the server must parse all the headers, convert them from []byte to string and put them into the map before calling user-provided request handler. This all requires unnecessary memory allocations avoided by fasthttp.
    • net/http client API requires creating a new response object per each request.
  • Why fasthttp API is incompatible with net/http?

    Because net/http API limits many optimization opportunities. See the answer above for more details. Also certain net/http API parts are suboptimal for use:

  • Why fasthttp doesn't support HTTP/2.0 and WebSockets?

    HTTP/2.0 support is in progress. WebSockets has been done already. Third parties also may use RequestCtx.Hijack for implementing these goodies.

  • Are there known net/http advantages comparing to fasthttp?

    Yes:

    • net/http supports HTTP/2.0 starting from go1.6.
    • net/http API is stable, while fasthttp API constantly evolves.
    • net/http handles more HTTP corner cases.
    • net/http should contain less bugs, since it is used and tested by much wider audience.
    • net/http works on Go older than 1.5.
  • Why fasthttp API prefers returning []byte instead of string?

    Because []byte to string conversion isn't free - it requires memory allocation and copy. Feel free wrapping returned []byte result into string() if you prefer working with strings instead of byte slices. But be aware that this has non-zero overhead.

  • Which GO versions are supported by fasthttp?

    Go1.5+. Older versions won't be supported, since their standard package miss useful functions.

    NOTE: Go 1.9.7 is the oldest tested version. We recommend you to update as soon as you can. As of 1.11.3 we will drop 1.9.x support.

  • Please provide real benchmark data and server information

    See this issue.

  • Are there plans to add request routing to fasthttp?

    There are no plans to add request routing into fasthttp. Use third-party routers and web frameworks with fasthttp support:

    See also this issue for more info.

  • I detected data race in fasthttp!

    Cool! File a bug. But before doing this check the following in your code:

  • I didn't find an answer for my question here

    Try exploring these questions.

Owner
Aliaksandr Valialkin
Working on @VictoriaMetrics
Aliaksandr Valialkin
Comments
  • Fasthttp behind Aws load balancer. Keepalive conn are causing trouble

    Fasthttp behind Aws load balancer. Keepalive conn are causing trouble

    Hi!

    We're using a light/fast fasthttp server as a proxy in our services infrastructure. However, we've been experiencing some issues when we use an amazon Load Balancer. Sometimes (and this is randomly) the ALB returns 502 because the request can't find the fasthttp service. Note that ALB uses keepalive connections by default and that can't be changed.

    After a while doing some research, we were suspicious that fasthttp was closing the keepalive connections at some point, and the ALB couldn't re-use it, so it would return a 502.

    If we set the Server.DisableKeepAlive = true everything works as expected (with a lot more of load of course)

    We reduced our implementation to the minimum to test:

    s := &fasthttp.Server{
    		Handler:     OurHandler,
    		Concurrency: fasthttp.DefaultConcurrency,
    	}
    	s.DisableKeepalive = true // If this is false, we see the error randomly.
    
    	log.Fatal(s.ListenAndServe(":" + strconv.Itoa(port)))
    
    

    The handler basically does this:

            // h is an instance of *fasthttp.HostClient configured with some parameters
    	if err := h.proxy.Do(req, resp); err != nil {
    		log.Error("error when proxying the request: ", err)
    	}
    

    Is there any chance someone has experienced this? I'm not sure how we should proceed with the keepalive connections in the fasthttp.Server, as we are using pretty much all the default parameters.

    Thanks in advance!

  • CORS: allow every origin with credentials

    CORS: allow every origin with credentials

    I have a simple question. I want to set "Access-Control-Allow-Credentials" to "true" and "Access-Control-Allow-Origin" to the current request origin, so every origin is allowed to access my API. Which method should I use on the RequestCtx to retrieve the current request origin which is eligible to show up in the CORS header? I tried different ones like ctx.RemoteAddr.String() or ctx.Request.URI().Host() but none of them worked.

    I want that because I want to achieve a JWT authentication using the Authorization header, which is only received if I allow credentials.

    Greetings

  • Reponse body io.Reader

    Reponse body io.Reader

    Hey guys. How to set custom response body writer? I've tried to use SetBodyStream, but i don't see any body readers from response which i need to pass in io.Reader. P.S I'm trying to implement throttler.

  • Too many timeouts when working with high concurrency

    Too many timeouts when working with high concurrency

    I use fasthttp client in an application that collects information about millions of sites on the network. To do this really quickly and in parallel, I create a bunch of goroutines in which I execute c.httpClient.DoTimeout (...) requests

    If I run no more than ~ 100 threads per core, then I successfully receive answers for all requests. If I run more than 100 threads per core, then part of the requests will be interrupted by timeout and I will get errors

    The problem is definitely not in the sites themselves.

    I think there are some restrictions on the number of open connections or something like that, but I don’t know where to dig.

    I will be very glad to any prompts.

  • the master branch's code is ok ?

    the master branch's code is ok ?

    1、today i go get new fasthttp code, i found when the browse send a request, somtimes it recevie a error message "Error when parsing request"

    2、why use os.Command().Output() int my handler, the bin will output "child exited" ?

  • Error 7 at 1-3 Open Connections

    Error 7 at 1-3 Open Connections

    Hi there,

    I'm currently at a loss as to what is bottle necking. As soon as I hit fasthttp with +1000 reqs/s (same origin), it starts to fail. Curl is throwing: curl: (7) Couldn't connect to server.

    I'm using fasthttp with fasthttp-router and their default configurations. Seeing that Open Connections is always below 5 from 262144 I don't see what could be causing this and have my doubts of it being caused by the app.

    Could this be a limit from the OS it self, are there any unix settings we need to change? In terms of connections we are using net.core.somaxconn = 16384

    Thanks for you help

  • Response.ContentLength Not correct

    Response.ContentLength Not correct

    Code:

    if len(string(resp.Body())) > 0 {
    	logs.DebugLog( "i got %d %s", resp.Header.ContentLength(), resp.String() )
    }
    

    #read log: [[DEBUG]]11:18:38 task.go:105: i got 90 HTTP/1.1 206 Partial Content Date: Mon, 25 May 2020 08:18:38 GMT Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8 Content-Length: 89

    What??? resp.Header.ContentLength()=90, resp.String() thinks different

    (I found this paradox out when wrote code:

    If resp.Header.ContentLength() > 0 {
    logs.StatusLog(resp.Body() )
    }
    

    and got many empty row on log ! Reading body is not match performance on empty response :-) )

    *Go 1.14 *github.com/valyala/fasthttp v1.9.0

  • Panics at on context close, v1.33.0

    Panics at on context close, v1.33.0

    Hello, unfortunately there are no more details except this message I could find.

    panic: runtime error: invalid memory address or nil pointer dereference
    [signal SIGSEGV: segmentation violation code=0x1 addr=0x200 pc=0x901667]
    
    goroutine 19473 [running]:
    github.com/valyala/fasthttp.(*RequestCtx).Done(0x8c4639)
            /go/src/dsp/vendor/github.com/valyala/fasthttp/server.go:2691 +0x7
    context.propagateCancel.func1()
            /usr/local/go/src/context/context.go:280 +0x50
    created by context.propagateCancel
            /usr/local/go/src/context/context.go:278 +0x1d0
    
  • Suggestion: Continuous Fuzzing

    Suggestion: Continuous Fuzzing

    Hi, I'm Yevgeny Pats Founder of Fuzzit - Continuous fuzzing as a service platform.

    We have a free plan for OSS and I would be happy to contribute a PR if that's interesting. The PR will include the following

    • go-fuzz fuzzers (This is generic step not-connected to fuzzit)
    • Continuous Fuzzing of master branch which will generate new corpus and look for new crashes
    • Regression on every PR that will run the fuzzers through all the generated corpus and fixed crashes from previous step. This will prevent new or old bugs from crippling into master.

    You can see our basic example here and you can see an example of "in the wild" integration here.

    Let me know if this is something worth working on.

    might be related to this https://github.com/valyala/fasthttp/issues/33

    Cheers, Yevgeny

  • Reverse Proxy?

    Reverse Proxy?

    The golang httputil package has a ReverseProxy that will serve from an http.Request.

    Is there any comporable revrese proxy for fasthttp that will serve from a fasthttp.Request?

  • I had write a simply httpproxy by fasthttp,but I had test the speed find the qps is so bad

    I had write a simply httpproxy by fasthttp,but I had test the speed find the qps is so bad

    fasthttp proxy wrk report that:

      ./wrk -c 1000 -t 1000 -d 30s http://127.0.0.1:8080/
    Running 30s test @ http://127.0.0.1:8080/
      1000 threads and 1000 connections
      Thread Stats   Avg      Stdev     Max   +/- Stdev
        Latency   123.28ms  283.75ms   1.99s    88.85%
        Req/Sec    49.95     49.44   653.00     68.67%
      103307 requests in 30.12s, 12.31MB read
      Socket errors: connect 0, read 0, write 0, timeout 2795
      Non-2xx or 3xx responses: 2136
    Requests/sec:   3429.97
    Transfer/sec:    418.45KB
    

    I use nginx proxy reports this:

     ./wrk -c 1000 -t 1000 -d 30s http://127.0.0.1:5555/
    Running 30s test @ http://127.0.0.1:5555/
      1000 threads and 1000 connections
      Thread Stats   Avg      Stdev     Max   +/- Stdev
        Latency   245.24ms  329.09ms   1.25s    79.48%
        Req/Sec    42.25     35.39     1.97k    60.26%
      434163 requests in 30.11s, 100.60MB read
      Socket errors: connect 0, read 0, write 0, timeout 604
    Requests/sec:  14421.42
    Transfer/sec:      3.34MB
    

    the fasthttp proxy code is that:

    package main
    import (
        "github.com/valyala/fasthttp"
        "time"
    )
    func test(ctx *fasthttp.RequestCtx){
      time.Sleep(100)
      ctx.WriteString("ok ")
    }
    func proxytest( ctx *fasthttp.RequestCtx){
    
        s:= &fasthttp.HostClient{Addr:"127.0.0.1:666"}
        req:=fasthttp.AcquireRequest()
        resp:=fasthttp.AcquireResponse()
        defer fasthttp.ReleaseRequest(req)
        defer fasthttp.ReleaseResponse(resp)
        ctx.Request.CopyTo(req)
        err:=s.Do(req,resp )
        if err!=nil{
            ctx.Error(err.Error(),504  )
        }
        resp.Header.Add("Server","waf")
        resp.WriteTo( ctx.Conn())
    }
    func main() {
    
        web:=&fasthttp.Server{Handler:proxytest }
        test:=&fasthttp.Server{ TCPKeepalive:true,TCPKeepalivePeriod:30*time.Second  ,  Handler:test }
        go test.ListenAndServe(":666")
        web.ListenAndServe(":8080")
        
    }
    

    the nginx conf is that:

    location /
    {
        proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:666;
        proxy_set_header Host $host;
        proxy_set_header X-Real-IP $remote_addr;
        proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-For $proxy_add_x_forwarded_for;
        proxy_set_header REMOTE-HOST $remote_addr;
        
    
        add_header X-Cache $upstream_cache_status;
        
        
    }
    

    why nginx is Requests/sec: 14421.42 ,but the fasthttp proxy is Requests/sec: 3429.97. how to improve my code

  • use tcpKeepaliveListener and reuseport together

    use tcpKeepaliveListener and reuseport together

    I need the functionality of both tcpKeepaliveListener and reuseport. something like this:

    func ListenAndServe() error {
    	s := &fasthttp.Server{
    		Handler: handler,
    		TCPKeepalive: true,
    		TCPKeepalivePeriod: 30 * time.Second,
    	}
    	ln, err := reuseport.Listen("tcp4", ":8080")
    	if err != nil {
    		return err
    	}
    	if tcpln, ok := ln.(*net.TCPListener); ok {
    		return s.Serve(tcpKeepaliveListener{
    			TCPListener:     tcpln,
    			keepalive:       s.TCPKeepalive,
    			keepalivePeriod: s.TCPKeepalivePeriod,
    		})
    	}
    	return s.Serve(ln)
    }
    
    

    is there a reason why tcpKeepaliveListener is private? is there another way to have both functionalities that I'm missing here? thanks a lot

  • BUG\Error! Lost Request answer.

    BUG\Error! Lost Request answer.

    Hello. Using this client in a high Traffic project. With critical response timings. All Response Types is Json. Requests is Post\Json. Its an API Server. But Sometimes in a huge traffic server looses packets. When i response to the request am logging it with conditions and duration. Request comes. fasthttp generates event. Events handled and response generated. Response sended to client. In Log appeds new line. But client Didnt get response at all. Client gets nothing. Even HTTP Errors. Try to capture data in tcpdump. There is Request -> Response , and Request with NO RESPONSE. How it can be? In log application writes that he responced. But in real world nothing sended to client.

    Снимок экрана 2022-05-16 в 4 55 09 PM
  • how do we use quic-go with fasthttp?

    how do we use quic-go with fasthttp?

    https://github.com/lucas-clemente/quic-go

    1. how do we use quic-go with fasthttp?
    2. any automatic letsencrypt example with quic-go with fasthttp as reverse proxy?
  • [helprefugees.eu] Go Guru needed!

    [helprefugees.eu] Go Guru needed!

    Hi @valyala , hope you are safe. I managed to gather a team and we are currently working on this project. I've written the backend using fiber, which everyone knows it uses fasthttp under the hood. While I consider myself a decent Go programmer, I could really use the help of someone with vast XP and you are my first choice. Let me know if you can help, so I can add you to the team. I've already shared the Project Doc to your Gmail.

    This is quite urgent, so any other help is appreciated, thank you!

  • changing between clients is too slow

    changing between clients is too slow

    guess what ! im back again with another question :) so before i asked you about the fastest way to run my program on high requests per second and you gave me this code:

    clientsMu.Lock()
    		client, ok := clients[proxy]
    		if !ok {
    			client = &fasthttp.Client{
    				Dial: FasthttpHTTPDialer(proxy),
    				ReadBufferSize: 8192,
    			}
    			clients[proxy] = client
    		}
    		clientsMu.Unlock()
    

    the code is working great and it gives me 40000 requests per second which is by far the best libary i have ever used "for sending requests" but my problem here is that when i run 40k r/s my proxies gets "rate limited" each 16.5 seconds and i need to clear the clients every 15 seconds to connect to an fresh ip "im using rotating proxies" here is my code:

    func clearclients() {
    	for true {
    		time.Sleep(15 * time.Second)
    		clients = make(map[string]*fasthttp.Client)
    
    	}
    }
    

    this will clear all old clients and create new ones

    but the problem here that it takes time each time i make an client clear my r/s goes from 40k to 2k and stays at 2k for 5 seconds then it goes up to 20k then 40k then again and again after 15 seconds same parallel haapens my script needs to stay stable at 40k r/s without going under that for more than 1 second so i tried an solution to make 2 clients maps and fill the first one with clients and use it for 15 second and meanwhile the second clients will fill clients into it then when 15 seconds finish from the first clients map 1 it will changes to clients number 2 map so what should happen "or what i thought at least" that if i pre connected to proxies with my clients number 2 it should be up and ready for sending 40k r/s same second but the problem here is that i still face the same problem each time i change from client 1 map to client 2 map the r/s goes down to 2k here is my code:

    func clearclients() {
    		for true {
    			time.Sleep(time.Second * 15)
    			var clients2 = make(map[string]*fasthttp.Client)
    			for _,proxy := range proxies{
    				clientsMu.Lock()
    				client, ok := clients2[proxy]
    				if !ok {
    					client = &fasthttp.Client{
    						Dial: FasthttpHTTPDialer(proxy),
    						ReadBufferSize: 8192,
    					}
    					clients2[proxy] = client
    				}
    				clientsMu.Unlock()
    			}
    			clients = clients2
    			time.Sleep(15)
    
    			var clients1 = make(map[string]*fasthttp.Client)
    			for _,proxy := range proxies{
    				clientsMu.Lock()
    				client, ok := clients1[proxy]
    				if !ok {
    					client = &fasthttp.Client{
    						Dial: FasthttpHTTPDialer(proxy),
    						ReadBufferSize: 8192,
    					}
    					clients1[proxy] = client
    				}
    				clientsMu.Unlock()
    			}
    			clients = clients1
    		}
    	}
    

    with this func it should every 15 seconds change between clients and its working but its slow i thought that what makes the script slower is that each time i clear my clients the script needs to re make clients and fill it into the map but if i already make that before sending requests with it why is it too slow ? does the client maps like save the connection between request and just re use it? thats why its slow even when i fill clients into client map without using requests? it only goes 40k r/s after i make an few requests to my target thank you for any help in advance ! much appreciated <3

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